Punishment, Consequentialist Justifications of Punishment - Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature - Professor Gendler - Lecture - Video-lecture

Video-lecture, Social Psychology

Description: The lecture begins with a consideration of the traditional consequentialist account of punishment---that punishment is justified by its deterrent effect on future crimes. Traditional criticisms of the view are presented, and John Rawls' two-level justification for punishment is offered as one possible way to avoid such criticisms by bringing together consequentialist and deontological justifications of punishment in a single theory. Next, Professor Gendler reviews some empirical research on punishment intuitions, including data on moral outrage and the "Knobe effect". The lecture concludes with a brief discussion of how moral luck interacts with intuitions about punishment. Show more
Docsity is not optimized for the browser you're using. In order to have a better experience please switch to Google Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer 9+ or Safari! Download Google Chrome