Stratification Theories - Social Stratification - Lecture Slides, Slides for Sociology. Chhattisgarh Swami Vivekanand Technical University
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shusta_m11 January 2013

Stratification Theories - Social Stratification - Lecture Slides, Slides for Sociology. Chhattisgarh Swami Vivekanand Technical University

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These are the important key points of lecture slides of Social Stratification are: Stratification Theories, Early Stratification Studies, Functional Model, Critics, Occupational Prestige, Conflict Model, Hunter, Debates,...
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Table 5-1. Kerbo’s Chapter 5 Outline: Modern (U.S.) Stratification Theories

• Early Stratification Studies: – Conflict: Veblen’s Leisure Class, Lynd’s Middletown – Order: Warner’s Yankee City

• Functional Model – Davis and Moore; Parsons – Critics – Occupational Prestige and SES

• Conflict Model – Hunter – Mills

• Debates – Basis of inequality – Theories of class

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Figure 5-1. Davis and Moore’s Functional Model of Inequality

Distribution Of Rewards

Recruitment of Best and Brightest

Change in Supply and Demand

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Table 5-2. Model Assumptions for Davis and Moore’s Functional Model of Social Stratification

1. Differential Functional Importance of Positions (Occupations)

2. Limited Supply of Qualified Persons

3. Differential Cost of Training Persons for Different Positions

4. Need to Induce Qualified to Bear Costs of Training

5. Inducements Include Subsistence/Luxury, Fun, Fame

6. Distribution of these Goodies as Inducements is Basis for Stratification

7. Thus Inequality is Inevitable and Functional (Necessary and Desirable)

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Table 5-3. Parsons’ Functional Model Assumptions

• Placement is Based on Moral Evaluation by Others

• Moral Evaluation is Based on Shared Value System (Consensus)

• Value System is Based in Dominant Institution (in Particular Time and Place)

• Exemplary (in these terms) are Awarded High Status, Income, Wealth

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Figure 5-2. Dahrendorf’s Model of Class Conflict

Authority

Subordinate

Conflict

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Figure 5-3. C. Wright Mills Model of the Power Elite

Government Leaders

Cultural Leaders Economic Leaders

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Figure 5-4. Conflict Functional Model of Inequality

Distribution Of Rewards

Status Quo

Mass Political Movements

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Figure 5-5. Dahrendorf’s Model of Class Conflict and Social Change

Established Authority

Charismatic Leader

Social Movement

Routinization

Collapse

New Authority

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Figure 5-6. Blau and Duncan’s Model of Socio- Economic Status

Average Education

For Occupation

Average Income For Occupation

Popular Perception of Occupation’s

Prestige

Prestige = constant + B1 (Education) + B 2 (Income) +/- measurement error

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Table 5-4. Class, Status and Power Dimensions Stressed in Stratification Paradigms (from Kerbo, p. 131)

Value Assumptions

Critical Uncritical

Model Assumptions

Order

Does Not Exist Functional Theory Status Honor

Conflict Ruling Class

Theory Class

Power-Conflict Theory Power

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Table 5-5. The Convergence of Occupational, Bureaucratic, and Property Divisions on Class Categories

Positions in three main types of institutional structures

Class categories

Occupation

Bureaucratic Authority

Property Relation

Upper Class

High

High

Owner

Corporate Class

High

High

Non-Owner

Middle Class

High to Mid

Mid

Non-Owner

Working Class

Mid to Low

Low

Non-Owner

Lower Class

Low

Low

Non-Owner

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Table 5-6. Wright’s Class Categories, Defined by Ownership, Employees, Skill, and Persons Supervised

Relations of Production

Class Owns M.O.P.

Employs Workers

Skill Level

Supervises Others

Capitalist Yes Many Variable Usually

Petty- Bourgeois

Yes Few Variable Few

Professional No No Expert No

Manager No No Expert Yes

Supervisor No No Low Yes

Skilled Worker

No No Medium No

Worker No No Low No

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Figure 5-7. Wright’s Model of Class Relations

Petty Bourgeois

Professional Worker

Employer

Skilled Worker

Manager

Worker

Artisanal Capitalist State Socialist

Source: Erik Olin Wright, “Varieties of Marxist Conceptions,” in Social Stratification, Edited by David B. Grusky (Westview, 2001), p. 124

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