World of Happiness-Lecture Slides (World Health Inequalities)-Literature, Slides for Psychology of Happiness. The University of Sheffield
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World of Happiness-Lecture Slides (World Health Inequalities)-Literature, Slides for Psychology of Happiness. The University of Sheffield

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These are the lecture slides by Dr. Danny Dorling who is a well known lecturer in the field of Happiness Studies. These Slides are from his lectures delivered in 2010. The following are the main points; Inequalities in H...
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Why are inequalities in health greater now than at any times since the 1920s?

Why are inequalities in health greater now

than at any times since the 1920s?

Danny Dorling

Talking Points Lecture,10th February 2010

Medical School Lecture Theatre 2, University of Sheffield

Organized by Yorkshire and Humber Teaching Public Health Network

and co-hosted by the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR)

Thanks to all who contributed to this lecture, especially

the Worldmapper group (Graham Allsopp, Anna

Barford, Benjamin Hennig, Mark Newman [University of

Michigan], John Pritchard and Ben Wheeler [University of

Cornwall]),

Bethan Thomas and George Davey Smith [University of

Bristol] for the most recent work on inequalities in Britain,

and to Dan Vickers and Dimitris Ballas who helped with

some of the others on the work on inequalities in Sheffield.

Why are inequalities in health greater now

than at any times since the 1920s?

Are they?

Why are they?

What to do?

Three Parts

Answers

Are they?

 they are for Britain by area, since 1930s

Why are they?

 much else polarized

What to do?

 realise how much all are harmed by

rising inequality – from national life

expectancy to local housing, education

and labour markets…

Are they?

 Here I will only talk about geographical inequalities

your chances depending on where you were born and live

– not to whom you were born.

 We don’t have enough information to be able to answer

this question worldwide, or for Sheffield, but we can for

Britain.

 People migrating in geographically selective ways appears

to matter more now than it did in the 1920s and 1930s

when inequalities were driven most strongly by material

deprivation, occupational and (still) infectious hazards.

 Today, in Britain, social inequality itself creates injustice.

Worldwide

 It can help to put local experiences in national and

international contexts for perspective;

 Inequality in health between countries fell, at least until

the 1980s and then rose;

 Superficially the rise could be accounted for by young

deaths due to AIDS;

 But worldwide inequalities in income and wealth were

also growing at this time.

 Infant mortality rates for my grandparents generation

were as high as in the poorest countries today.

Global Life Expectancy (years)

Dorling, D. et al. BMJ 2006;332:662-664

Copyright ©2006 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

Global life expectancy slope index of inequality between nation states (in years). Black triangle shows estimated index in 2000-5 with impact of AIDS removed

GDP development 1955-2000s

 Sustaining postwar growth in rich nations after the 70s

would have required another planet, or redistribution.

Instead there was a hugely inefficient redistribution of wealth to the richest nations.

A more equal world would have seen far fewer young deaths than now occur.

Decadal growth rates

(in GDP)

-20%

-10%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

1 9 5 5

1 9 6 0

1 9 6 5

1 9 7 0

1 9 7 5

1 9 8 0

1 9 8 5

1 9 9 0

1 9 9 5

2 0 0 0

Africa Asia Americas Europe

1973 1969

1968 1977

Age of Death: Infants (aged under 1)

 8,142,016 deaths

Age of Death: 1-4

 2,556,272 deaths

Age of Death: 5-9

 863,022 deaths

Age of Death: 10-14

 536,950 deaths

Age of Death: 15-19

 870,915 deaths

Age of Death: 20-24

 1,273,937 deaths

Age of Death: 25-29

 1,496,071 deaths

Age of Death: 30-34

 1,606,806 deaths

Age of Death: 35-39

 1,652,503 deaths

Age of Death: 40-44

 1,788,164 deaths

Age of Death: 45-49

 2,098,466 deaths

Age of Death: 50-54

 2,412,379 deaths

Age of Death: 55-59

 2,802,369 deaths

Age of Death: 60-64

 3,615,847 deaths

Age of Death: 65-69

 4,548,376 deaths

Age of Death: 70-74

 5,416,482 deaths

Age of Death: 75-79

 5,410,001 deaths

Age of Death: 80-84

 4,381,231 deaths

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