Aut Con Firearms Design Book2, Notas de estudo de Engenharia Militar
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Aut Con Firearms Design Book2, Notas de estudo de Engenharia Militar

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Firearms design 2
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3 mostrados em 71 páginas
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AUTOMATIC AND " CONCEALABLE FIREARMS DESIGN BOOK, VOLUME II Automatic & Concealable Firearms Design Book Volume IL by the Editors of Paladin Press Books É Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press Published by Paladin Press, a division of Paladin Enterprises, Inc., PO Box 1307, Boulder, Colorado, 80306. All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced in any form without express written permission from the publisher. ISBN 0-87364-177-9 Printed in the United States of America WARNING It is against the law to manufacture a firearm without an appropriate license from the federal government. There are also state and local laws prohibiting the possession of such weapons in many areas. Severe penalties are prescribed for violations of these laws. Be warned! CONTENTS Foreword.......cciccicscerererrerennsrarecneccenc arena o rrna nen ren rna arara rasa nenem 1 Introduction ......scccssecestrenenanareaa ea cercaneerean cerne re sencrcarsarersa curtas 3 Colt .45 Machine Pistol Conversion ..........ccccicrccsccrecrerrnaerarera carro raeruaes 5 Shotgun Pistol .........ccccccccecrererrenera era cancrie erre re naun cenas r sa ranraraars 13 Mini-Magnum .22 M.R.F. ........cicicc cc cisererrre rr rea nearanseare cer rceesareno 19 Heckler & Koch Model 91 & 93. ...24 Mini Machine Pstol ........ci.isrseress ...32 Winchester Model 64 & Model 490 .22 Cal. ...38 The Knuckle Gun.........cccscccerererererereerenecencanarcencene ore caranancaserro 48 Front Bolt Action Assault Shotgun.........cccsccrccceracerrerrnacereraeranevacenarano 52 Revolver Knife .......ccccrense eos 1.57 Slam Bang Shotgun ................. ...63 Appendix: Photos ........cccccssesereaneanereraerncererera vens canaarerrrrencrarasas 66 FORWARD Firearm manufacturers today employ production techniques which can differ greatly in approach and form. Some have maintained their traditionally high production standards, while others utilize various short-cut manufacturing methods. Though such short cuts help keep prices down, too often the quality of the finished weapon will suffer as a consequence, Stamping and casting of parts, two very effective and economical fabrication methods, are employed almost universally by current arms manufacturers. Many reliable, good quality firearms are produced every day with the help of these cost-cutting measures. These techniques were originated by the Germans during World War II, and have been in use ever since. The primary purpose of this series is to familiarize gunsmiths, collectors, and law enforcement officers with improvised firearms. These volumes incorporate detailed drawings in order to teach the reader principles of automatic weapons conversions, and other mechanical aspects related to improvised weapon construction and modification. The illustrations will also enable law enforcement agents to identify and classify improvised weapons. Another purpose exists for these books as well. The editors are aware that our society may face violent turmoil sometime in the future. Should this situation occur, the individual citizen will have to depend on himself for protection of his life, family, and property. His means of protection will most likely be a firearm. If he does not have a gun, then these volumes can help him build one, They may also aid him in modifying and improving his commercial firearms, if necessary. INTRODUCTION Improvised weapons, most notably firearms, have gained great popularity in the rural areas of the world. The residents of such areas are generally poor, and cannot afford to buy commercially produced firearms. There is not much access to commercial firearms in these areas anyway. Presented in this book are improvised firearm designs as developed and hand-built by rural gunsmiths in the Philippines. Neighboring countries such as Bornea, Sumatra, and Malaysia have their own versions of these weapons. They may vary slightly in materials, style, and size. Rural gunsmiths in Pakistan and India also produce variants of these designs, many being of relatively good quality. Most of the firearms built by villagers in the Philippines are completely handmade. The gun parts are individually cut and formed to shape with hand tools. Screws, rivets, and brazing hold the parts together. Some customers special order their firearms, and provide high quality materials for the gunsmith to work with, Most of the jungle gunsmiths make their living by hand-building firearms, and are accomplished in their work. When given high quality materials to use, as with a special order, they can fabricate firearms of surprising quality. Consider the source of these weapons. It will often be a small hut Turnished with a simple workbench, anvil, vise and blacksmith's furnace. The gunsmith's tools are files, hacksaws, punches, and hammers. Such a basic workshop greatly resembles the blacksmith's shops found in the rural Philippines. No wonder, then, the village blacksmith often builds and sells his own improvised firearms where there is no farm equipment to repair. In urban areas of the Philippines, better equipped improvised gunsmiths also operate. Here they have access to better quality materials, and electricity. Such illegal gunshops are not only found in relatively poor countries, but can be found in any modern nation that restricts the private ownership of firearms. Many of the Philippino gunsmiths have produced copies of Smith & Wesson and Colt revolvers, and even Colt .45's. The barrels of these handguns are rifled in a crude manner, using improvised techniques. External configurations are well copied, as are barrel and receiver markings. A closer examination will show brazing marks on every joint, especially on the receiver of a revolver. The barrel, and sometimes a ventilated rib, are also brazed in place to the receiver. An internal examination of a Philippino revolver copy will reveal an entirely simple double-action lockwork. The use of this action precludes the need for internal machining of the receiver. The lockwork resembles that found in Colt revolvers. However, the improvised model has no rebounding hammer; the hammer always rests against the firing pin. This system is very dangerous, and demands that the cylinder be positioned so that the firing pin points between the chambers of the cylinder when not in use. Some special-order Smith & Wesson copies are copied almost exactly, externally and internally. These show internal machining and a rebounding hammer as found in the originals. But brazing marks are still noticeable when closely examined. Because of the high costs involved, most Philippino improvised firearms are not special ordered. A villager will often settle for any firearm that works. It is a common saying in the remote areas of the Philippines that a discharge from a hand-made firearm cannot be distinguished from a commercial model, especially at night. The production of these modern improvised firearms began in the Philippines when W'W II ended. At that time, bandits and cattle rustlers plagued the rural areas of the island chain. The closest police authorities to these areas were three or more days distant. Most of the outlaws had been guerrilla fighters against the Japanese during WW II, and did not recognize the independent government arranged during the American occupation after the war. The majority of the Philippino citizens recognized the new government, however, and stopped supporting the guerrilla movement. In turn, the outlaws fled to the mountains, where they began the systematic terrorization of the rural villagers. After stealing anything of value, the outlaw gangs would burn entire villages and their surrounding crop lands. They would finish by stealing the villagers” cattle and water buffalo, upon which the peasant farmers depended for food, and for power to cultivate their land. This situation led the villagers to begin improvising their own weapons. Jungle workshops began appearing, particularly in the central and northern sectors of Luzon, one of the islands in the Philippine chain. Villagers first improvised a weapon popularly called “The Flying Icepick.” It was simply a sling-shot designed to fire a sharpened length of wire fletched with fine feathers. The missile's head was flattened, sharpened, and notched. When firing, the notches were engaged with a wire catch, found in place of the pouch normally associated with sling- shots. Firing was then achieved in the same manner as with a normal sling-shot. To make the missile more lethal, villagers sometimes dipped the wire point in snake venom. Along with the bow and arrow, the “Flying Icepick” provided the remote villager with their only means of defense against the outlaw gangs for some years. Their weapons were most effective at night, when they could silentiy strike at the bandits, killing some of them and unnerving the remainder. But the bandits soon altered their tactics. They began attacking villages by day, taking a great toli among the primitively armed peasants. Villagers in turn began improvising their own firearms in earnest. Jungle gunsmiths in Ilocos province began making a firearm called the “*Paltiç”, It soon became popular in other areas of the Philippines. Due to scarce supply of ammunition, the most common home-made gun was and still is the shotgun. Many of these are of the “Slam Bang” design, being made entirely from water pipe. The most common improvised shotgun is single shot, utilizing a break open action, and with a very ong barrel. Its hammer is exposed and is single action. A separate piece is made and carried to manually eject spent shells from the shotgun”s chamber. Cutdown versions of these weapons have also appeared, and are known as shotgun pistols. To increase firepower, the village gunsmiths have made bolt action, magazine fed shotguns. These are copied from commercial rifles. The magazines" capacities range from four rounds in 12 gauge, to ten rounds in .410 gauge. Brazing and riveting are used extensively in improvising the receivers and magazines of these weapons, with great success. Muslim gunsmiths in southern Mindinao have produced the most unusual version of the improvised shotgun to appear lately, These are revolving cylinder shotguns with a five or six round capacity. Some of these weapons have been confiscated, and are found to be well-buikt and fairly sophisticated. Most of these are manually operated, though some -410 models use the double-action lockwork found in modern revolvers. The Muslim gunsmiths also rely heavily on brazing when fabricating their firearms, The popularity of improvised firearms among Philippino gangs reached its peak during the early 1960"s. Many of the gangsters at this time were ex-convicts who had learned improvised gunsmithing while in prison. Once released from jail, the convicts would build their own weapons, since Philippine law forbids them ownership of weapons. Stricter police control has since subdued these gangs” activities. A word of caution here. Any firearm improvised from cheap materials of unknown analysis, especially those crudely made, are dangerous. Philippine authorities have on record many instances where Slam Bang shotguns have blown-up in the face of the operator. Similarly, revolver copies have exploded like fragmentation grenades while being fired. This is due to an excessive gap between cylinder and barrel, allowing propellant gasses to escape there, and causing lead to stack in the revolver barrel. Improvised firearms, then, have caused innumerabie accidents. But the poor farmer or villager has no choice but to rely on home-made weapons for self-defense. He has a family and property to protect against wellarmed terrorist-bandits. More often than not, his protection takes form as a simple firearm built from salvaged materials in a jungle workshop. For him, it is foolish to go unarmed any longer, for he has lived through the hard times of the past. And he knows that harder times may still come in the future. COLT .45 MACHINE PISTOL CONVERSION SPECIFICATIONS: CALIBRE .........cccesstssearesererereer ee! 45 ACP TYPE OF FIRE . -. SELECTIVE SEMI AND FULL AUTOMATIC (FIRES SEMI AUTOMATIC ON CLOSED BOLT AND FULL AUTOMATIC ON OPEN BOLT.) - 7 SHOT MAGAZINE STANDARD; 30 SHOT MAGAZINE AVAILABLE BARREL LENGTH ............ 5 INCHES STANDARD; 6 INCHES AVAILABLE CAPACITY .. REMARKS: NUMEROUS ACCESSORIES ARE AVAILABLE: MAXI COMPENSATORS, SLIDE RELEASES, TIGHT BUSHINGS, SPEED SAFETY, ETC. SPECIAL NOTE: COLT .45 VARIATIONS AND IMITATIONS SUCH AS THOSE MANUFACTURED IN EUROPE, SOUTH, AND CENTRAL AMERICA CAN BE SIMILARLY CONVERTED TO SELECTIVE FIRE. SYSTEM OF OPERATION: TO FIRE SEMI AUTOMATIC: Set the selector lever to the horizontal position. To disengage the selector lock from the underside of the slide, press the top portion of the selector lever to withdraw its under lug from mating with the slide edge. Once the lug clears the slide edge, it can be rotated horizontally in either direction. Once the selector is set in detent in the horizontal position, the tripping of the selector is out of engagement with the connector lever. Drawing the slide to the rear will cock the hammer and load the chamber in the usual fashion, maintaining that position until the trigger is pressed. The semi automatic operation fires from the standard closed bolt system. If is important to press the auxiliary trigger (front) at all times so that the front (auxiliary) sear does not catch the slide in open position. TO FIRE FULL AUTOMATIC: Set the selector lever to its position locking the under lug to the slide. The lug must mate with the edge of the slide as tightly as possible to avoid accidental disengagement during full automatic operation of the slide. The selector's detent spring must be strong to retain its engagement firmly in this position. In the full automatic setting, the auxiliary trigger mechanism takes over. The slide will be held in the open bolt system by the front (auxiliary) sear, ready to fire. The original semi automatic trigger mechanism is activated automatically by the slide closing, once the selector tripping shoulder makes contact with the hammer sear connector, whether the rear (original) trigger is pressed or not. Once the selector lever tripping shoulder pushes the connector, the sear will disengage from full cocked hammer, releasing it to strike the firing pin and ignite the cartridge. This operation is continuous until the front trigger is released or the magazine empty. CAUTION: NEVER RETRACT THE SLIDE IF THE SELECTOR IS SET TO FULL AUTOMATIC WHEN THE GUN IS LOADED AND THE AUXILIARY TRIGGER MECHANISM IS NOT INSTALLED. THE WEAPON WILL FIRE FULL AUTOMATIC EVEN WITHOUT PRESSING THE TRIGGER SINCE THE SELECTOR TRIPPING SHOULDER WILL AUTOMATICALLY OPERATE THE CONNECTOR LEVER DURING BOLT CLOSING. SAFETY OPERATION: - The original safety can be used on both semi (closed bolt) and full automatic (open bolt) functioning. However, care must be taken that the auxiliary (front) trigger not be pressed if the selector is set to full automatic and the slide is held open. The connector pin connected to the sear will break if the auxiliary trigger is pressed in open bolt with the selector in the full automatic mode, CONSTRUCTION DETAIL OF THE AUXILIARY TRIGGER MECHANISM: The auxiliary trigger housing is a formed 1/16 inch steel sheet. It contains the auxitiary sear and trigger and can be improvised by machine or handmade. The housing is secured in place to the trigger guard and to the front portion of the receiver by a screw and by a pin riveted to a plate. An insert is used to strengthen the housing and can be riveted or brazed in place. The trigger guard is equal in width to the receiver trigger guard and secured to the housing by a small screw. It can be brazed to the housing if so desired. The other end is pointed and is pressed to the wood grip, secured by a small nail or screw. The auxiliary housing assembly must be attached to the receiver body before the grip stock can be secured to the auxiliary housing. An assembly hole must be drilled in the receiver for the grip screw. PARTS LIST Selector lever Selector lever index ball spring Selector lever index ball Selector lever retaining screw; chambered for selector lug, upward clearance to disengage from the slide edge. Connector spring base; 1/8 inch diameter pin - same height as the stock screw bushing. Connector mating pin to sear Connector lever Connector lever spring Connecting pins, plate for auxiliary trigger housing Plate retaining screw; left side hole of the auxiliary housing must be threaded for this screw. . Replacement sear; with provision hole for connector mating pin . Auxiliary housing rear securing pin . Auxiliary trigger housing insert; to be brazed or riveted to housing . Auxiliary trigger housing . Auxiliary housing connecting screw to receiver body . Grip stock screw; hex type . Stock screw bushing; pressed horizontally to stock . Front sear pin ). Sear spring ). Sear spring plunger . Sear . Trigger guard connecting screw; guard can also be brazed in place , Trigger guard , Trigger pin . Trigger spring . Trigger spring plunger . Trigger . Nail; acts as support against plunger . Small nai! securing the bottom part of trigger guard to stock | Wood stock; one piece construction (plastic is adaptable) COLT .45 MACHINE PISTOL CONVERSION O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press 7 VV TM Lig O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press 4 Creu!) DAak 7 PRIMA Te MOLE THEE” FO MAN! SI0E 08 RE - CHE VER FOR CONECTOR ARVER Au UMAAN CE, MOLE “X"| O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press 2, NELE TO MIGHT SIOE CE REGE UAQ ÍVO MRESS FIN ÊBIA. DIM FO MONAT RM AS 4% FOR COMMEEIOR SPRING. DETAME PUNILANRY TRIQRER * MUNANRY TRIGGER HeitsiiG INEERT QETAI. LJ PUVIKRARS TRIGEER HOUSE DEAL TE-——— mm oo a lo ASS o o z DRIAK SE MORE TO RECIEVER FAOOR “AS ORANA VEDA MEX SeNEM) NESO CLERAANCE WNEM) Co EeriNa AUNILENKS HOMSINE TO RECIEVER G60Y, (BASO GRIP SPOCM 4 PRjhk | MORE ANO IVGESD TO Momar AUNIAs ARY Matra! G GEFOME STOCK ASSEMBLY. CRENRAN CA CUT FOR RIGNT SO E STOEM FORM CONECTOR M65y. CUT HE ConTACS FASE DE THE CRIA GALETY (SNNOAP AREA) FOR COUNECTOR MEEY, CLEARANCK À O GRIP SArETy E Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press N7 SELECIOR CAN BE ROTATED OU PITHER WAY FOR SEMA. GUTO, PUNCTIONHAE. TRIPPING EMOMAOR AAA NO GNSNCE CONMECTOR TIP. O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press MIDEX NBRES (3) Dé qo — - 4 DRIBLE G NOUE ANO IMAGÃO (SRE DIAGAS) JO MOUNT SELECIOR EVER eme —— FIRE Sato SERMATIONS AS GRAN FOR SERRE - TOR REVER CREMRANEE. SHELECTOR KEVER INIAÓIE SHONKOEA OF SELECTOM hEVER, AsSO KOERS FME SELEEIOM TO S40€ 406. MEMENCE MET SERA SOR SERECTIVE IME. “ 4 eau! DRI já 219 APR CONECTOR AEUVER SUN, SEM COMES AVE ENONGA DAAY WE LESS EM EGO TO MORE. DRIGINIAA SERA O QUNECIOR LEVER md ID BE nseRTES TO HOLE NE OR RECIGUE. CONHECIOR LEVER CONECTOR SARNÃE PUNINKORY SEBR PETRIL, o DS CON ECIING INS OLSTE FOR LUNIRANRY TRICÇER tous, o O 9 RIVES OR SAR Dial AsAT: € ( pom biés ) O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press SHOTGUN PISTOL SPECIFICATIONS: CATEGORY -. HANDMADE - IMPROVISED CALIBRE ..........cicscciccreiero 410 TO .12 GAUGE CAPACITY. -. SINGLE SHOT - DOUBLE BARREL VARIANTS POSSIBLE TYPE OF OPERATION ................... MANUAL REMARKS: VARIOUS STYLES AND BARREL LENGTHS ARE ADAPTABLE. TO LOAD: To load the pistol, rotate the latch lever 180 degrees counter- clockwise. The latch lever pin secures the barrel connecting lug to the receiver frame. Once the latch lever is rotated, the barrel can be hinged open for loading. After inserting the cartridge, push the barrel back to its seat on the receiver. Then rotate the latch lever clockwise to lock the barrel connecting lug to the receiver body. The barrel chamber must be center- bored for a cartridge rim seat. TO FIRE: Once the barrel has been fully seated and locked in place, pull the cocking handle on top of the bolt tube to the rear until it engages the sear. Pressing the trigger will release the bolt (which contains the firing pin) from sear engagement, discharging the pistol. SAFETY MECHANISM: A safety lever is incorporated in this model to prevent accidental release of the bolt mechanism. When the bolt is in the full cocked position, engaged with the sear, the safety lever pin blocks and prevents any movement of the sear. The bolt also can be lowered by simply easing the cocking handle slowly to its rest position. Note: boit cannot be cocked if safety is applied. CAUTION: IT IS NOT SAFE TO CARRY THIS PISTOL LOADED. THE FIRING PIN IS PRESSING AGAINST THE CARTRIDGE PRIMER WHEN THE BOLT IS IN ITS REST POSITION. LOAD ONLY WHEN READY TO FIRE. OTHERWISE DRAW THE BOLT OPEN AND APPLY THE SAFETY. EXTRACTOR: An improvised extractor is housed inside the grip base securing the breech block inside the bolt tubing. It is retained in place by a spring loaded plunger. Pull the extractor by its head under the grip base when needed. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL: Like most of the modern improvised methods, the receiver frame is a simple formed steel sheet about 1/16 inch thick. A pivot lug and connecting lug are brazed or welded under the barrel for loading and unloading purposes. The barrel is thick seamless tubing (diameter depends on the calibre or gauge). A commercial type barrel is safer to use. The bolt tube is the same diameter as the barrel. It is retained to the receiver frame by the grip base connecting the breech block to the tube, and by its rear lug, which is welded or brazed in place. The grip is one piece. Make it from wood or from plastic stock. Et is to be inserted through the grip base. Secure it to the base by a single screw positioned at the back of the stock, mating to a threaded hole in the grip base. Alltrigger mechanisms (trigger, sear, etc.) must conform in thickness (equally or less thick) with the barrel pivot lug, connecting lug, and rear lug of the bolt tube in order to function freely when assembled inside the receiver frame; preferably 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick. PARTS LIST 4. Front sight - brazed or silver soldered in place (top of barrel) 2. Barrel - thick seamiess tubing or cut down commercial barrel (chamber is counterbored) 3. Steel washer 4 Hex screw - securing barrel connecting lug to trigger housing 5. Barrel lug latch lever 6. Latch lever pin 7. Latch lever bail spring 8. Ball (steel) 9. Latch lever retaining pin - if possible roll pin 10. Hex screw - retaining firing pin spring & guide post and its base to trigger housing 11. Steel washer 12. Hex nut 13. Steel washer 14. Hex nut 15. Steel washer 16. Breech block 37. Firing pin 18. Breech block retaining post pin 19. Cocking knob 20. Firing pin spring 21. Bolt 22. Receiver - same diameter as barrel 23. Spacer (2 pr.) for sear pin 24. Receiver back cover 25. Firing pin spring & guide post retaining pin 26. Firing pin spring & guide post 27. Barrel connecting lug - brazed to barrel (4% in. thick plate) 28, Same as f4 29. Front screw retaining trigger guard 30. Trigger guard 304. Same as 6 31, Spacer (2 pr.) for trigger . Trigger . Trigger bar . Trigger bar support pin (front) . Rear screw securing trigger guard . Extractor catch (plunger) spring plug-screw (headless type) . Plunger spring . Extractor catch (plunger type) . Main base for trigger housing & receiver (14 in. dia. post) + Grip (one piece wood) . Extractor extension (handle) . Extractor head . Extractor retaining pin . Trigger housing - formed steel sheet Sear . Sear pin . Sear spring , Same as 10 . Firing pin & spring guide base support (14 in. thick plate) . Receiver back cover retaining screw . Trigger bar support pin (rear) . Grip screw Gy 23.23. PEL Z In LIAN! RECEIVER /GRIP BASE SHOTGUN PISTOL O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press axa los! | 08 596 a 3) FiRne PN SPRINyS GUIDE “IBASE SUPPORT— f = ] fear 1. f ( T T ' | É | 1) :B Li ' o | ; l CORE SIDE en) 68; 37 138, E O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press 16 CRORED CHAMBER ——, FiRIGo PM SERINE THREAD Hetg FOR CORE ANO SCREW “FRRERL FOR RECEIVER Sn bias, ee SotT O| TRICGER (BAR SUPPORT | FiRINCo EN O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press 17 | FORMED SHEET, METAL IRIGEER HONSILG l O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press MINI-MAGNUM .22 M.R.F. SPECIFICATIONS: CLASSIFICATION ....... IMPROVISED - HANDMADE CALIBRE . «. 22 L.R.22M.R.F. ADAPTABLE TO VARIOUS PISTOL AMMUNITIONS. OPERATION ............. MANUAL SINGLE ACTION TRIGGER SYSTEM. NO AUTOMATIC EXTRACTOR, OVERALL SIZE .............. DEPENDS ON CALIBRE TYPE USED, REMARKS: MANY VARIANTS HAVE BEEN ENCOUNTERED IN VARIOUS CALIBRES, SYSTEM OF OPERATION: To load the weapon, pull the slide to cocked position, then apply the safety by rotating the safety lever upward 90 degrees. The safety lever pin will lock the sear in place. The latch lever located on the right side of the frame has to be rotated 180 degrees towards the thumb. The latch lever pin locks the under lug of the barrel to the frame. The barrel can then be pivoted upward with the left hand into open position exposing the dual chambers, ready for loading. Since the dual firing pins protrude on the breech block when in the forward position, it is safer to have it in the open cocked position with the safety applied, If the slide is cased forward on a loaded chamber, the firing pins are pressing against the cartridge rims by the pressure of the slide spring, liable to ignite it any time and fire the weapon unintentionally. There is no built in extractor on the weapon. A separate extractor with double fork type plungers is improvised and can be carried conveniently in the pocket. A pocket clip built in to the extractor holds it in place. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL: Every part of this weapon is hand-made. The steel used should be of known analysis, so that the parts can be properly heat-treated before final assembly and use. The frame sides are constructed from 1/16 inch sheet steel, cut and formed to shape with hand tools. Two separate frame sides are formed. Use 1/4 inch thick steel plate to form the grip base (17), slide spring base (14), breech block (6), and the under lug of the barrel. The trigger guard is made from 1/16 inch thick by 1/4 inch wide steel, If welding equipment is available, braze the grip base, breech block, and trigger guard in place on one frame side. Use rivets for this step if you don't have access to a welding set-up. The other frame side is secured to the receiver body by the barrel pivot screw, and another screw located under the slide just above the grip angle. Make the slide from 1/16 inch sheet steel. It carries a plate containing the dual firing pins. This plate is secured under the slide by a screw (3), which is positioned to act as a rear sight. The slide spring (13) is a cut- down pistol or revolver hammer spring, available through mail order. It should not be larger than 1/4 inch in diameter to work reliably. Form a barrel from 1/2 inch thick steel of high quaity. It can either be machined and rifled if you have a machine shop, or hand built, with a smooth bore, if you do not. The barrel's under lug must be 1/4inchin width, to fit in its space in the frame. To retain the latch and safety levers in place, spring-loaded index balls must be fitted in them. The two piece grip can be made from either wood or plastic. Secure it to the grip base by two screws with appropriate nuts on the other stock panel. O Po ma A Sa A o o tu PARTS LIST Firing pin base guide rod Firing pin base Slide retaining pin - pin head slotted as rear sight Firing pins Side plate (2 pcs.) also receiver body Breech block Counter bored chambers Cal, 22 magnum chamber Barrei - no riflings (improvised) . Barrel latch lever pin . Front sight . Slide" . Fenition spring . Base for ignition spring . Sear . Sear spring . Base for grip stock . Grip stock - wrap around . Barrel pivot screw . Trigger guard . Safety Jever pin . Stock screws . Trigger 20 ee EM haver SAFETY sEVER MINI-MAGNUM .22 M.R.F. O Copyright 1979 by Paladin Press 21
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