Figures of speech, Slides de Língua Inglesa. Universidade do Porto
Meirinho
Meirinho14 de Julho de 2015

Figures of speech, Slides de Língua Inglesa. Universidade do Porto

PPT (4 MB)
17 páginas
865Número de visitas
Descrição
Figures of speech by Sapienza
20pontos
Pontos de download necessários para baixar
este documento
baixar o documento
Pré-visualização3 páginas / 17
Esta é apenas uma pré-visualização
3 shown on 17 pages
baixar o documento
Esta é apenas uma pré-visualização
3 shown on 17 pages
baixar o documento
Esta é apenas uma pré-visualização
3 shown on 17 pages
baixar o documento
Esta é apenas uma pré-visualização
3 shown on 17 pages
baixar o documento
opdvdpojdvfasaojask

LABORATORIO DI INGLESE SPECIALISTICO FIGURES OF SPEECH CONTINUED…. + SOME 

GRAMMAR (RELATIVE CLAUSES  ­   COMPARISON  FORMS AND SUPERLATIVES

FIGURES OF SPEECH CONTINUED…

ANTONOMASIA

THE “SUBSTITUTION OF AN EPITHET OR  APPELLATIVE, OR THE NAME OF AN OFFICE OR  DIGNITY, FOR A PERSON’S PROPER NAME”. E.G.: ‘THE IRON DUKE OF WELLINGTON’, ‘HIS GRACE  THE ARCHIBISHOP’, AND SO ON. 

ALSO, THE USE OF A PROPER NAME TO EXPRESS A  GENERAL IDEA, e.g.: CALLING AN ORATOR A CICERO;  A CASANOVA, A CASSANDRA, ETC.

IT EXPLOITS METAPHOR AND SIMILITUDE.

IT USES ALSO PERIPHRASES (OR CIRCUMLOCUTION): THE ATHENS OF THE NORTH: EDINBURGH  

CAN YOU GUESS THE SUBJECTS IN THESE  EXAMPLES? THE DIVIDED CITY (some 15 years ago….)       THE EMERALD ISLE     /   THE ETERNAL CITY   THE IRON LADY  / THE BIG APPLE

HOW WOULD YOU NAME A LONG, COMPLEX  JOURNEY, FULL OF EXPERIENCES?

... AN ODYSSEY

EUPHEMISM

USED MAINLY IN FORMAL SPEECH. ITS AIM IS TO  TONE DOWN THE IMPACT OF OFFENSIVE,  EMBARASSING EXPRESSIONS OR PAINFUL  SITUATIONS. 

USE OF ACRONYMS TO ‘HIDE’ THE ACTUAL  MEANING OF THE SINGLE WORDS.

C.W.: CHEMICAL WEAPONS / PLWA: PERSON LIVING  WITH AIDS  /   OAP: OLD­AGE PENSIONER   ETHNIC CLEANSING: GENOCIDE ELDERLY/ SENIOR CITIZENS: OLD PERSON        NEUTRALIZE: KILL NON­PERFORMING ASSET: LOAN, OR SOMETHING BAD KILLED BY FRIENDLY FIRE: KILLED ACCIDENTALLY BY  WEAPONS FIRED BY THEIR OWN SIDE BRACELETS: HANDCUFFS A FAMILY: A MAFIA GROUP TO PASS AWAY: TO DIE EASY MONEY: STOLEN OR ILLEGALLY GAINED MONEY

HYPERBOLE

WORDS OR EXPRESSIONS THAT TEND TO  EXAGGERATE SOME SITUATIONS OR ASPECTS OF  REALITY.

A FLOOD OF TEARS  /  TONS OF MONEY I’VE GOT A THOUSAND AND ONE THINGS TO DO THE OFFICE WAS FLOODED WITH APPLICATIONS FOR  THE JOB MILLIONS OF EXAMPLES

WHAT ARE THE FIGURES OF SPEECH TO REMEMBER?

METAPHOR  /   METONYMY AND SYNECDOCHE      SIMILITUDE   /    ANTONOMASIA  

EUPHEMISM    /    HYPERBOLE

EXAMPLES:

RED TAPE  ­   TURKEY: AN AWAKENING GIANT ­ A  TONS OF FIASCOS   ­  THE EMERALD ISLE ­  NEUTRALIZE  ­  THE WOUNDED BEAR (RUSSIA)   ­  DISCREET AS A TOMBSTONE  ­   PUPPET  GOVERNMENT   ­   WHITE  KNIGHT  ­  WALL STREET   ­  A FLOOD OF TEARS  ­   BRACELETS  

RELATIVE CLAUSES (WHO/WHICH/THAT)

WHO OR THAT ARE USED IN A RELATIVE CLAUSE  TO IDENTIFY PEOPLE:

“HE HAS THE AIR OF A MAN WHO/THAT HAS DONE  THIS MANY, MANY TIMES BEFORE”

WHICH OR THAT ARE USED FOR THINGS:

“BOLDNESS AND VISION ARE QUALITIES  THAT/WHICH ALL LEADERS SHOULD HAVE”.

IF THE RELATIVE PRONOUN DEFINES THE  SUBJECT OF THE SENTENCE, THEN IT MUST BE  INCLUDED:

“A COUNTERFEITER IS A PERSON WHO/THAT  COPIES GOODS IN ORDER TO TRICK PEOPLE”

“WHERE IS THE DOCUMENT WHICH/THAT  WAS ON THE TABLE”?

HOWEVER, IF WHO/THAT OR WHICH/THAT   INDICATES THE OBJECT IN THE SENTENCE,  THAN IT CAN BE OMITTED:

“PEOPLE (WHO/THAT) WE EMPLOY ARE VERY  HIGHLY QUALIFIED”.

 “HAVE YOU READ THE REPORT  (WHICH/THAT) I LEFT ON YOUR DESK”?

NON­DEFINING CLAUSES PROVIDE EXTRA  INFORMATION ABOUT THE SUBJECT OR OBJECT OF A  SENTENCE. THE SENTENCE STILL MAKES SENSE  WITHOUT THIS INFORMATION; THE EXTRA  INFORMATION IS SEPARATED BY COMMAS.

WHO (NOT THAT) IS USED FOR PEOPLE: SIR LINDSAY, WHO TURNS 62 THIS MONTH, IS NOW  THE CHAIRMAN.

WHICH (NOT THAT) IS USED FOR THINGS: JOHN TOLD ME ABOUT HIS NEW JOB, WHICH HE’S  ENJOYING VERY MUCH.

COMPARISON AND SUPERLATIVES

1. The comparative and superlative forms of one­syllable  adjectives are formed by adding –er  and est: “The country enjoys an advantage because of lower  labour costs”. “All countries, including the poorest, have assets (beni,  risorse)”. 2. We often use ‘than’ after a comparative: My salary is higher than yours. John’s car is more expensive  than mine.

Adjectives of 3 ore more syllables have more and the  most before the adjective itself:

It’s more expensive than the old model. (COMP.) It’s the most expensive model in the range. (SUPER.) ‘The’ is normally used before a superlative. But  possessives can be used instead of ‘the:

“The oldest car manufacturer in Italy / Italy’s oldest  car manufacturer”.

After a superlative we can use ‘in’ or ‘of’. In is  used for places and groups of people: It’s the most expensive hotel in Oxford. Who is the best player in the team? This question is the most difficult of all. August is the wettest month of the year. 4. After the superlative there is often a clause: This is the best model we have ever produced. That was the most delicious meal (that) I’ve  ever eaten.

IRREGULAR FORMS

 Adj./Adv.               Comparative            Superlative

good/well                  better                      best  

bad/badly                  worse                       worst

far                 farther/further     fartherst/furthest

comentários (0)
Até o momento nenhum comentário
Seja o primeiro a comentar!
Esta é apenas uma pré-visualização
3 shown on 17 pages
baixar o documento